GOTA supports research conducted by OTs,  OTAs and students from across the country. Please feel free to review any of the research topics below to provide feed back to or to participate in. These research projects are not conducted by GOTA, but instead independently through various universities. Questions regarding any of the studies should be directed to the contact listed within the study.

Interested in posting your study or research?

Please email the following information to our office at [email protected]

i. Title of Research
ii. Population of interest
iii. Time frame to have research information posted online.
iv. Additional information you would like to share about the study.


 

Are you a pediatric OT or COTA?  

posted 12.12.18

You are invited to participate in a brief survey on oculomotor skills and occupational performance.  

Your participation is valuable in order to understand how pediatric occupational therapists are incorporating oculomotor skills in evaluations and everyday practice. 

Visual performance and oculomotor skills are important part of routine tasks for children including school and self-care.  Current trends show that occupational performance for children is directly impacted by oculomotor skills.

  This survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete and your responses will remain anonymous. We ask that you forward this survey to any additional pediatric therapists within your professional and personal network.  

If you have any questions please contact the co-investigator, Karen Morris at [email protected] 

 

Thank you for your time!  

Karen G. Morris MOT, OTR/L

Quinnipiac University Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Candidate 

 https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OToculomotorpediatrics

 


 

Student research on therapists use of evidence-based practice with patients who have TBI

posted 11.26.18

If you are an OT or OTA who works with clients affected by traumatic brain injury, please consider taking the time to fill out this short and anonymous survey for occupational therapy graduate students who are researching the use of evidence-based practice among OTs treating clients with TBI. If interested, click the link: 
Thank you,
Christopher Plague, OTS
Stanbridge University - Irvine, California

 

Research study from Stanbridge University Master's of Science Occupational Therapy program - Use of mindfulness techniques for chronic pain conditions by OT practitioners

posted 11.26.18

Dear Occupational Therapy Practitioners,

 

We are conducting research regarding occupational therapy practitioners using mindfulness treatment/intervention when working with clients with chronic pain. This research is conducted for the sake of better understanding the current use of mindfulness in occupational therapy to treat symptoms of chronic pain and spreading awareness of mindfulness use in occupational therapy practice. This survey is part of completing our thesis at Stanbridge University in Irvine, California.

 

Please extend our invitation to practicing OTRs/OTAs at your universities, organizations, alumni, or facilities. This survey should take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete. 

 

Please click on the link below to a browser: https://www.esurveycreator.com/s/3a235c8

 

Thank you very much,

 

Katherine Chen, OTS

Jannet Chen, OTS 

Nadia Rashid, OTS 

Kathryn Cristal Respicio, OTS 

Cristina Scionti, OTR/L  


 

Seeking OT and OTA Pediatric practitioners with at least 1 month and no more than 3 years’ experience

posted 10.15.18

"Stanbridge University's MSOT Transition2PedsOT research group invites you to participate in our online study regarding the educational and medical models on service delivery within the pediatric ASD population!

We are seeking OT and OTA practitioners with at least 1 month and no more than 3 years’ experience, who are either new or are transitioning practitioners to a pediatrics-based practice setting.

Our goal is to use the survey to examine how information on the medical and educational model is disseminated to new OT graduates and transitioning practitioners, how this affects treatment planning, and how treatment planning affects reimbursement within these models.

The online survey can be completed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/transition2pedsot and will take no more than 15 minutes to complete.

Please complete the survey by 11/16/2018.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact [email protected]

Thank you very much for your time!"

 


 

Burnout and Attributional Style Among Occupational Therapists

 posted 10.15.18

Dear Occupational Therapist, 
You are invited to take part in a funded study, “Burnout and Attributional Style Among Occupational Therapists,” developed by entry-level doctoral occupational therapy students and the principal investigator, Professor Julia Shin, OTR/L from Creighton University (Omaha, NE).  The purpose of this national-level online survey is to collect data on OT practitioners’ level of burnout and pattern of attributional reasoning skills.  The survey is entirely anonymous and voluntary and will take approximately 30 – 45 minutes to complete.  If you would like to participate, please click on the link below to begin the survey: 
We would greatly appreciate your consideration and participation in our research survey!  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Professor Julia Shin, OTR/L via phone at (402) 280-4327 or via email at [email protected] Thank you very much! 
The answers to the questions listed on your website are also listed below:
i. Title of Research - Burnout and Attributional Style Among Occupational Therapists
ii. Population of interest - Occupational therapists that recently graduated and are working in their first job 
iii. Time frame to have research information posted online - As soon as possible for you!
iv. Additional information you would like to share about the study - This study was developed by entry-level doctoral occupational therapy students and the principal investigator, Professor Julia Shin, OTR/L from Creighton University (Omaha, NE). The purpose of this national-level online survey is to collect data on OT practitioners’ level of burnout and pattern of attributional reasoning skills. The survey is entirely anonymous and voluntary and will take approximately 30 – 45 minutes to complete. The survey link is:
 
 
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Professor Julia Shin, OTR/L via phone at (402) 280-4327 or via email at [email protected]